Cambridge University

Rosalind Parkes-Ratanshi

Email Address:
Department:
Institute of Public Health

Dr Rosalind Parkes-Ratanshi is a Global Health specialist who combines research with clinical work and innovative health system projects to sustain health services for infectious diseases in Africa. She has over 15 years’ experience working in Uganda. She served as head of clinical services at Infectious Diseases Institute Makerere, University and in 2015 she established the Academy for Health Innovation, Uganda at IDI. The Academy has supported over 50,000 beneficiaries and 5000 health care workers across 11 projects including an e-learning platform, an interactive voice response tool, Call for Life, and the ARTAccess app for supplying HIV medicines in private pharmacies. Currently she is working on a drone project for supplying medicines on islands in Lake Victoria. She is also a Principal Research Associate in Public Health at University of Cambridge. She is a Fellow Royal College of Physicians, London and the Faculty of Public Health.

Research pillars
  • Global health
Areas of Interest
  • Africa
  • eHealth
  • Global Health
  • Healthcare delivery/services
  • HIV/AIDS
  • Infectious Diseases

News and Events

CPH Seminar: Towards a value proposition for Ageing Friendly Communities
CPH Seminar: Towards a value proposition for Ageing Friendly Communities - 26 Nov 2021

People are living longer. Yet for many, the opportunities afforded by a longer life – to themselves and society – are lost due to poor health and difficulty remaining involved in society. This is exacerbated by socioeconomic disadvantage, and associated with increasing social and economic costs. The balance between the ‘burden’ and the benefits of an ageing population can thus be tipped either way. One promising approach is to design enabling ‘ageing-friendly’ environments that support people to live well.

Blog

Lest we Forget: Engage with communities for better uptake of malaria RTS,S/AS01 vaccine - Ngo Bibaa Lundi-Anne Omam
Lest we Forget: Engage with communities for better uptake of malaria RTS,S/AS01 vaccine - Ngo Bibaa Lundi-Anne Omam

For several decades, malaria has caused the deaths of tens of millions of people especially in sub-Saharan Africa. It caused 229 million cases and 409,000 deaths globally in 20191. In fact, every 2 minutes, a child dies from malaria accounting for about 67% of all malaria deaths worldwide1.