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Cambridge Public Health

 

Natasha’s main research interests relate to medical sociology, particularly health inequalities and public health, as well as the processes related to the production of social policy. She is also interested in social theory and its use in enhancing the outcomes of research. She previously worked as a postdoctoral Research Associate for the St John’s College Reading Group on Health Inequalities.
https://www.thisinstitute.cam.ac.uk/staff/dr-natasha-kriznik/

Publications from Elements

Journal articles

2019 (Accepted for publication)

  • Dixon-Woods, M., Lame, G. and Kriznik, N., 2019 (Accepted for publication). Challenges in making standardisation work in healthcare: lessons from a qualitative interview study of a line-labelling policy in a UK region BMJ Open,
  • 2018 (Accepted for publication)

  • Barker, M., Colbourn, T., Dombrowkski, SU., Fall, CHD., Kriznik, NM., Lawrence, W., Norris, SA., Ngaiza, G., Patel, D., Skordis-Worrall, J., Sniehotta, FF., Steegers-Theunissen, R., Vogel, C., Woods Townsend, K. and Stephenson, J., 2018 (Accepted for publication). Intervention strategies to improve nutrition and health behaviours before conception The Lancet,
    Doi: http://doi.org/10.1016/S0140-6736(18)30313-1
  • Kriznik, NM., Kinmonth, AL., Ling, T. and Kelly, MP., 2018 (Accepted for publication). Moving beyond individual choice in policies to reduce health inequalities: the integration of dynamic with individual explanations Journal of Public Health,
  • Kelly, M., Kriznik, N., Kinmonth, AL. and Fletcher, P., 2018 (Accepted for publication). The brain, self and society: a social-neuroscience model of predictive processing. Social Neuroscience,
  • 2016

  • Szreter, S., Kinmonth, AL., Kriznik, NM. and Kelly, MP., 2016. Health, welfare, and the state—the dangers of forgetting history The Lancet, v. 388
    Doi: 10.1016/S0140-6736(16)32429-1