Cambridge University

Evidence Synthesis

The gathering of existing evidence is an essential part of any research – the process crystallises current knowledge, identifies gaps, and contextualises future work. Every researcher needs core skills in identifying the question, selecting the appropriate resources to search, knowing how to search them thoroughly, critiquing the evidence gathered, and then disseminating the new knowledge. Cross disciplinary working adds another layer of complexity to evidence synthesis.

The theme of Evidence Synthesis crosses all the pillars of Cambridge Public Health, and is integral to all the areas of research.

The University Libraries already offer a great deal of support for the development of these information skills which are so necessary for evidence synthesis, for example in the provision of CamGuides, a resource that focuses on some of the academic and information practices and skills that students commonly engage in, or require, for their degrees.

In addition, subject specific support is available from faculty and departmental librarians, for example in the group teaching and one-to-one support available from the Medical Library team. Project specific collaboration and support is also available, with skilled librarians able to support all aspects of work from grant writing through to publication.

In the first instance the Evidence Synthesis theme will ensure that all existing support is clearly signposted. We also will work to ensure that more tailored support is available for the complex interdisciplinary work that CPH will foster.

The Evidence Synthesis Theme is led by Isla Kuhn.

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CPH Seminar: Towards a value proposition for Ageing Friendly Communities
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People are living longer. Yet for many, the opportunities afforded by a longer life – to themselves and society – are lost due to poor health and difficulty remaining involved in society. This is exacerbated by socioeconomic disadvantage, and associated with increasing social and economic costs. The balance between the ‘burden’ and the benefits of an ageing population can thus be tipped either way. One promising approach is to design enabling ‘ageing-friendly’ environments that support people to live well.

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