Cambridge University

Professor Zoe Kourtzi

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Zoe Kourtzi is Professor of Experimental Psychology and Computational Cognitive Neuroscience at the Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge. Her experimental work aims to understand the role of lifelong learning and brain plasticity in enabling humans of all ages to translate sensory experience into adaptive behaviours. Her computational work aims to develop predictive models of mental health and disease based on large-scale population data. Her work has translational impact in the early diagnosis and design of personalised interventions in healthy ageing and mental health disorders. Dr Kourtzi received her PhD from Rutgers University and was postdoctoral fellow at MIT and Harvard University. She was a Senior Research Scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics and then a Chair in Brain Imaging at the University of Birmingham. She moved to the University of Cambridge in 2013 and she is the Cambridge University Lead at the Alan Turing Institute.

Research pillars
  • Life-course and ageing

News and Events

CPH Seminar: Towards a value proposition for Ageing Friendly Communities
CPH Seminar: Towards a value proposition for Ageing Friendly Communities - 26 Nov 2021

People are living longer. Yet for many, the opportunities afforded by a longer life – to themselves and society – are lost due to poor health and difficulty remaining involved in society. This is exacerbated by socioeconomic disadvantage, and associated with increasing social and economic costs. The balance between the ‘burden’ and the benefits of an ageing population can thus be tipped either way. One promising approach is to design enabling ‘ageing-friendly’ environments that support people to live well.

Blog

Lest we Forget: Engage with communities for better uptake of malaria RTS,S/AS01 vaccine - Ngo Bibaa Lundi-Anne Omam
Lest we Forget: Engage with communities for better uptake of malaria RTS,S/AS01 vaccine - Ngo Bibaa Lundi-Anne Omam

For several decades, malaria has caused the deaths of tens of millions of people especially in sub-Saharan Africa. It caused 229 million cases and 409,000 deaths globally in 20191. In fact, every 2 minutes, a child dies from malaria accounting for about 67% of all malaria deaths worldwide1.