Cambridge University

Professor Mike Kelly

Email Address:
Department:
Department of Public Health and Primary Care

My research interest are the prevention of non-communicable disease, living with chronic illness, health inequalities, health related behaviour change, end of life care, dental public health, improving rates of physical activity, the relationship between evidence and policy and the methods and philosophy of evidence based medicine.

Research pillars
  • Health inequalities

Publications

Key publications: 

• KRIZNIK, N.M., KINMONTH, A.L., LING, T., KELLY, M.P. (2018) Moving beyond individual choice in policies to reduce health inequalities: the integration of dynamic with individual explanations, Journal of Public Health. 40 (4): 764–775, https://doi.org/10.1093/pubmed/fdy045
• KELLY, M.P. & BARKER, M. (2016) Why is changing health related behaviour so difficult? Public Health, 136: 109-116 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.puhe.2016.03.030
• KELLY, M.P. & KELLY, R.S. (2018) Quantifying social influences throughout the life course: action, structure and ‘omics’, in, (eds), Meloni M., Cromby, J., Fitzgerald, P., Lloyd, S. (eds) The Palgrave Handbook of Biology and Society, London: Palgrave Macmillan. pp 587-609. https://link.springer.com/book/10.1057%2F978-1-137-52879-7
• ISBN 978-1-137-52878-0
• KELLY, M.P. & RUSSO, F. (2018) Causal narratives in public health: the difference between mechanisms of aetiology and mechanisms of prevention in non-communicable diseases. Sociology of Health and Illness. 40 (1): 82–99. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1467-9566.12621/pdf
• KELLY, M.P. (2019) Cognitive biases in public health and how economics and sociology can help overcome them. Public Health. 169: 163-72.

News and Events

Recent CPH seminar with Nik Johnson now available
Recent CPH seminar with Nik Johnson now available -

The recent CPH Seminar, "The use of compassion and cooperation in delivering improved public health for communities," is now available. Watch now!

Blog

Lest we Forget: Engage with communities for better uptake of malaria RTS,S/AS01 vaccine - Ngo Bibaa Lundi-Anne Omam
Lest we Forget: Engage with communities for better uptake of malaria RTS,S/AS01 vaccine - Ngo Bibaa Lundi-Anne Omam

For several decades, malaria has caused the deaths of tens of millions of people especially in sub-Saharan Africa. It caused 229 million cases and 409,000 deaths globally in 20191. In fact, every 2 minutes, a child dies from malaria accounting for about 67% of all malaria deaths worldwide1.