Cambridge University

Dr John Ford

Email Address:
Department:
Public Health and Primary Care, Department of

My main interest is health inequalities and in particular what the NHS can do about them. I am currently working with NHS England and the University of York to look at inequalities in avoidable unplanned admissions across England to produce national recommendations. This involves exploration of national data and case studies in six different Clinical Commissioning Groups.

My NIHR Doctoral Research Fellowship looked at how disadvantaged older people from rural areas access primary care. The first two years were spent generating theory based on a realist review, cohort analysis of ELSA using structural equation modelling and semi-structured interviews/focus groups. In the second two years I completed a feasibility study to improve access to primary care for older people with four general practices in Norfolk. The main publications can be found on the publications section below.

Other research projects include: an analysis of the Global Burden of Disease, which has been published in the Lancet, and a feasibility trial of goal setting in primary care for patients with multi-morbidity.

Research skills include mixed methods, primary care trials, evidence synthesis, meta-analysis, cohort analysis and service evaluation.
I am currently an associate editor with the journal Public Health.

Research pillars
  • Health inequalities
Areas of Interest
  • Health inequalities

Publications

Key publications: 

Inequalities in primary care accessFord J, Jones A, Wong G, Clark A, Porter T, Steel N.
Access to primary care for socio-economically disadvantaged older people in rural areas: exploring realist theory using structural equation modelling in a linked dataset
BMC Medical Research Methodology 2018 18(1) DOI 10.1186/s12874-018-0514-xFord J, Turley R, Porter T, Shakespeare T, Wong G, Jones A, Steel N.
Access to primary care for socio-economically disadvantaged older people in rural areas: a qualitative study
PLoS ONE 2018 13 (3) article no. e0193952Ford J, Jones A, Wong G, Steel N.
Access to primary care for socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas: A realist review
BMJ Open 2016 6(5):e010652Ford J, Jones A, Wong G, Clark A, Porter T, Shakespeare T et al.
Improving access to high-quality primary care for socioeconomically disadvantaged older people in rural areas: a mixed method study protocol
BMJ Open 2015;5:e009104Ford J, Jones A, Wong G, Steel N.
Weekend opening in primary care: Analysis of the General Practice Patient Survey
British Journal of General Practice 2015 65, pp. e792-e798Global Burden of DiseaseSteel N, Ford J, Newton J, Davis A, Vos T, Naghavi M et al.
Mortality, causes of death, years of life lost, years lived with a disability, and disability-adjusted life years in the countries of the UK and 150 English Local Authority areas 1990-2016: a systematic analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2016
Lancet 2018, 392, pp1647-1661

News and Events

CPH Seminar: Towards a value proposition for Ageing Friendly Communities
CPH Seminar: Towards a value proposition for Ageing Friendly Communities - 26 Nov 2021

People are living longer. Yet for many, the opportunities afforded by a longer life – to themselves and society – are lost due to poor health and difficulty remaining involved in society. This is exacerbated by socioeconomic disadvantage, and associated with increasing social and economic costs. The balance between the ‘burden’ and the benefits of an ageing population can thus be tipped either way. One promising approach is to design enabling ‘ageing-friendly’ environments that support people to live well.

Blog

Lest we Forget: Engage with communities for better uptake of malaria RTS,S/AS01 vaccine - Ngo Bibaa Lundi-Anne Omam
Lest we Forget: Engage with communities for better uptake of malaria RTS,S/AS01 vaccine - Ngo Bibaa Lundi-Anne Omam

For several decades, malaria has caused the deaths of tens of millions of people especially in sub-Saharan Africa. It caused 229 million cases and 409,000 deaths globally in 20191. In fact, every 2 minutes, a child dies from malaria accounting for about 67% of all malaria deaths worldwide1.