Cambridge University

Capacity Building

At Cambridge Public Health, we welcome the growing interest in and awareness of public health both as an area of study and practice, and in its importance in today’s world. Recent events have highlighted the role of public health approaches to infectious disease, inequalities and healthcare systems, prompting many people from a variety of backgrounds to question the status quo. 

Public health is all about looking at the big picture, using strategic and systems-based approaches to tackle the biggest issues in our society — the so-called “wicked” problems. We tackle health and healthcare challenges such as health inequalities, the prevention of chronic disease such as diabetes, heart disease and dementia, and how to make the best use of scarce healthcare resources.

We even address problems in other sectors such as violent crime or homelessness through the use of innovative approaches to analysis, interventions and evaluation. Public health specialists use their expertise to ground actions in high quality evidence, developing approaches that are academically rigorous and include evaluation to monitor the impact of what we do.

If you are intrigued by the potential of public health approaches, but are not sure about the next step, browse through the links to the left to find out more about how you can get involved with CPH's Capacity Building programmes.

 

News and Events

Recent CPH seminar with Nik Johnson now available
Recent CPH seminar with Nik Johnson now available -

The recent CPH Seminar, "The use of compassion and cooperation in delivering improved public health for communities," is now available. Watch now!

Blog

Lest we Forget: Engage with communities for better uptake of malaria RTS,S/AS01 vaccine - Ngo Bibaa Lundi-Anne Omam
Lest we Forget: Engage with communities for better uptake of malaria RTS,S/AS01 vaccine - Ngo Bibaa Lundi-Anne Omam

For several decades, malaria has caused the deaths of tens of millions of people especially in sub-Saharan Africa. It caused 229 million cases and 409,000 deaths globally in 20191. In fact, every 2 minutes, a child dies from malaria accounting for about 67% of all malaria deaths worldwide1.